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Part One.

Vincent Owners have been meeting regularly in the Coventry area since Thursday 10th December 1953 when they held their first meeting at the Phoenix pub (now the Wing Wah Chinese Restaurant) on the Coventry by pass. In 1953 there were few sections, only five British sections, London, Liverpool, Oxford, Bristol and the Midlands and just one overseas Section, the Canadian and US section. Until then local members had been attending Midland section meetings but in Midland survey in MPH 58 it was announced that year there was to be meeting at the Rising Sun, Bedworth on the 14th October “for members who find it difficult to get to Wolverhampton but who would like to meet weekly”. This move was in fact in response to previous meeting of local members at the City Arms, Earlsdon.  Following the Bedworth meeting it was stated that meetings would continue to be held at the Rising Sun until suitable premises could be found in Coventry. From that Phoenix meeting it was run as section in its own right organising its own programme. The first Coventry Section Survey appeared in MPH 71 “we are now operating as a separate entity and a cordial invitation  is extended to all members in the vicinity”.

The Early Years

When the section was formed Vincent’s were still in production. Ross Motors at Hinckley were enthusiastic main dealers, some members had bought their bikes new from them, others second hand but the average age of all of them could not have been more than four,  in fact Series B’s with their Brampton forks were decidedly old fashioned. The herd instinct was strong, new members were always being sought and Ross Motors did their bit by putting a club membership form with every bike sold.  Section activities reflected the fact that for most members the Vincent was their sole means of transport. Weekend runs, evening runs, that sort of thing. With fewer meetings and fewer Sections, when a meet was organised by someone in the club then there would be a run to it.

The fact that it was a club for the riders of current motorcycles is demonstrated by a special supplement on glossy paper in the very same MPH that carried Coventry Section’s first review. MPH 71 for November 1954 coincided with the launch of the Series D, “Startling Vincent Developments” to quote Motor Cycle for November 4th.  The MPH supplement gave the Editor’s impressions of a spin up the Great North from the works on a Series D. and a brief description of its main features.  The following April when it was reported that Paul Richardson would be coming to the Phoenix on a Knight thirty six members turned up to greet him.

Despite the stated purpose of the Rising Sun meeting being to provide local weekly meetings the initial pattern was for fortnightly meetings with runs out to local pubs in the intervening weeks.  It was not till much later, the middle of 1957 in fact, that it was decided that henceforth, when British Summer Time ended, that the section would meet, a) weekly and b) on a Friday, a practice which has continued up to the present day.  In the early programme the evening runs were typically listed  as  Ron’s Ride or Fred’s Ride, leave HQ at 7.30. On the 3rd December 1954 John Timms led the ride to the Shoulder of Mutton at Stretton on Dunsmore. At the very first meeting a year previously, A Cawley had signed in three non members, J. Timms and the Misses Jones.  When John became a member he was signing in one of the Miss Jones himself; they became the Mrs Timms and Cawley respectively.  As an aside one of my first Vincent memories was riding pillion on Tony’s Cawley’s Comet when a fellow apprentice, his younger brother Vin Cawley, borrowed it one weekend for an Apprentice Association Navigation Trial.  Tony is still a life member living in Australia now.    

From the beginning meetings followed the normal noggin and natter pattern with the occasional invited speaker.  One such was Roy Charlton who was one of the first to race a stripped down Vincent, Rumblegutz, in sprint meetings with great success.  The main suppliers were also active in supporting the club and could be relied on for speakers in the winter session.  Also in the case of Avon a visit to their factory became a well remembered event.  In December 1954 they had their first Annual Dinner, to be followed by “fun and games”. It was the next one in January 1956 which was first to be christened the Godiva Banquet, events which were to become such a feature of  the Section history, not least the fun and games after the meal.

By February 1955 that they actually got round to officially electing a committee with Geoff Milson as Organizer, Jim Clift as Treasurer, Jim Randle as Social Secretary and John Edwards as Sports and Entertainments Officer.  Meanwhile things were stirring in the East.  Following a meeting on the Victoria Embankment, Trent Bridge on May 15th the East Midlands section was formed with Doug Hart as their Section Organiser with a home soon to be found at the Fox Hotel Loughborough.  The times they were a changing. In December Bazz Arnold introduces himself as their new acting Organiser, Doug Hart being off to pastures new, Africa in fact, and was encouraging the rest of the section to go to Coventry for Geoff Milson’s Godiva Banquet.  Except in fact as Acting Organiser Allan Nash explained in his first survey in February that on the day Geoff was nowhere to be seen having rushed off down to West Country to take over the Kings Arms at Bradford on Avon.

Rather fittingly the first Godiva banquet was held at the Leofric Hotel and was a complete hat trick of firsts.  It was the first function to be held at the newly opened hotel which was itself the first newly built major hotel to be opened in the UK since the war. When the prizes were given out the Treasurer’s dad, Jim Clift senior no doubt got his for winning the first navigation trial. The following year Pat Cusson would be the first recipient of the Navigation Trophy Shield for winning the 1956 event. This shield is still competed for to this day. The Godiva Banquets and Navigation Trials, together with the Stan Powell dimension merit their own stories and will be told separately.  This particular Banquet is a convenient point at which to end the tale of the start of the Coventry Section. 

George Spence.  April 2012.

<Back    Part One.    Part Two.    Part Three.    Part Four.   Part Five.   Part Six.   Part Seven.  Part Eight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Springs and seats.

 

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

 

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

 

 

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

 

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

 

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

 

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

 

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

 

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

 

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

 

 

girling springs

 

 

David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:


Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

 

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

 

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

 

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

 

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

 

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

 

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

 

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

 

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

 

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

 

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

 

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

 

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

 

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

 

 

girling springs

 

 

David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:


Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

 

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

 

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

 

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

 

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

 

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

 

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

 

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

 

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

 spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

Springs and seats.

As I have discussed on the damper pages, the standard rear springs are very short and stiff because they were only designed for the friction damped “B” series, so they make very little use of the available suspension travel.

The well-known Petteford springs are good, but at 189 lb/in they are rather stiff and have little or no pre-load.

Softer springs with more preload can make better use of the available suspension travel without increasing bottoming out, so they are more comfortable.

Fortuitously, Girling rear springs are of a diameter that is a good fit in the Vincent spring cases. New spring platforms are needed to replace the claws.

It is important to put a chamfer on the face that abuts the inside of the spring boxes, as the inside of the spring box end is not flat. Make these custom “platforms” as thin as practical, as the springs are on the long side.

adapter for girling springs

Spring Compressor

A spring compressor will probably be needed to compress the springs so they can be fitted to the bike.

Eddy Grew has devised an easily made device to do the job, details here: - Spring Compressor

spring compressor

What Spring Rate?

Obviously, partly sprung bikes can use softer springs than fully sprung bikes and bikes mainly used solo can use softer springs than bikes used for two up touring.

I note that PEI said that the rear springs carry 66% of the rider weight and 100% of the passenger weight. (This is for the standard semi-sprung arrangement of course.)

My testing has all been with a fully sprung bike mainly used solo.

I was surprised how well 100 lb/in Girling springs worked, and they may be just right for a solo rider with a semi-sprung seat. I had expected them to be much too soft, but with the good damping they worked very well, giving a very comfortable ride. I used them for several months. I eventually decided that they bottomed out a little too much. I could have reduced or cured this by increasing the preload, but I like a low saddle height so I decided to use stiffer springs.

I now use the Girling 132 or 145 lb/inch springs, which are just right. For the 132lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64539963 (black) or 64543764 (chrome), paint code red/orange, free length 8.47 inch. For the 145lb springs, these are Girling part numbers 64543818 (black) or 64544234 (chrome) paint code blue/yellow, free length 8.19 inches. Both are made from 0.282 inch diameter wire.

Most of the many varieties of Girling springs available are too long for our purposes. I found a simple way to shorten springs that are only slightly overlong. Close up fully with some stout studding, apply hot air gun to one end only. Leave to cool while stress creep takes effect. This works surprising well, so well that I overdid the first one. Reversing the process was trickier and best avoided, so proceed with caution.

Note that replica Girling units often use springs of slightly larger diameter than the genuine Girling springs, and are unsuitable as they are likely to jam in the cases, as I found out.

If you can’t find Girling springs at reasonable prices, custom made springs are likely to cost around £50 a pair. This could be greatly reduced if you can find four other people to share an order for ten springs.

Girling Springs.

Colours refer to identification marking. 3 splashes in the order Primary-Secondary-Primary

girling springs


David Kitrosser in Massachusetts sent us some feedback that you might find useful:

Thanks for the work on dampers.  Some feedback:
I am now using the AVO dampers Front (TA1447) and Rear (TA1446 ) and one each Girling 64539963 (132 lb/in) and 905463(?) (126 lb/in) springs. 
Fully sprung seat.  Little bit higher than I'd like but tolerable.  Springs only shortened by 1/8 inch or so.  (If shortened more, the damper doesn't go to full extension without the springs rattling loose?)  Springs fit without compressing first with damper at full extension. 
No change to mudguard positioning.  Seat rear links adjusted so seat just clears mudguard at full compression.   With my wife (125 lb) on the rear, me on the front (160 lb), appears to just bottom out on good size bumps according to an observer (watching gap between seat and mudguard) following behind.  Bottoming out not at all noticeable to riders.

Seats

A quick comment on the seat supplied by the VOC Spares Company, which is the most comfortable seat I have used.

I made a slight mistake in ordering the long version. All of the extra length is added to the passengers part, and when the seat is fully sprung, it collides with the rear lifting handle.

So I would strongly recommend these seats for comfort, but don’t buy the long version unless it is really needed!

Girdraulic Forks

After I had got the rear suspension working well, it was more apparent that the front forks had a rather harsh action, so I embarked on what became a rather lengthy attempt to understand and improve them.

Summary here: LINK TO FOLLOW!

If you wish to contact me: - Click here to email Rob Staley

Rob Staley, 20 September 2015

 

AVO Dampers | Springs and Seats

 

AVO Dampers for B, C, & D Series Vincents | Springs and Seats

 

AVO Dampers for B, C, & D Series Vincents | Springs and Seats

AVO Dampers for B, C, & D Series Vincents | Springs and Seats

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